Lorand Pusok, Nurse, Northampton General Hospital

July 25, 2017

 

“I owe a lot to Northampton General Hospital for my career progression”

Romanian born Nurse, Lorand Pusok feels honoured and valued to be working at Northampton General Hospital. He has worked at the hospital for five years and has been overwhelmed by how much support and encouragement he has received to develop his skills and career.

He moved to the UK in 2010, after living in Romania and initially relocated to Northampton to work in a nursing home. However, the role was lacking in career progression; he wanted to feel challenged in his role and to develop as a nurse.

He started working at Northampton General Hospital (NGH) in 2012, as a Staff Nurse and was promoted to a Junior Charge Nurse and then to a Ward Charge Nurse. The hospital has helped him to develop his skills and to progress within his role – something he says wouldn’t have happened in Romania.

He explains: “I never wanted to be a Ward Manager but colleagues encouraged and supported me to become one.” He feels that he, “owes a lot to the people who have helped him to develop himself”.

NGH is leading the way in excellence and training, and there are huge opportunities for doctors, nurses and midwives to develop skills and progress within their career.

It is the first hospital in the UK to affiliate with the American Nurses Association scheme, called Pathway to Excellence, an internationally-recognised programme for nursing and midwifery standards.

As an ambassador for the Pathway for Excellence, Lorand attends monthly meetings to advise everyone about the programme and its benefits. In April he went to America to see first hand the Pathway of Excellence, he believes that wouldn’t have happened if he had stayed in Romania.

Lorand says, “It is a wonderful programme, it includes looking after the wellbeing of staff and empowering them to make decisions, they can now decide how they want to work. It is all about everyone working together as one team.”

He says the career opportunities at NGH are fantastic – people are given real opportunities to develop themselves and the hospital helps to empower employees.

Lorand works in trauma and orthopaedics, on a 28-bedded ward that specialises in fractured hips. He is the only male in the hospital that is a Ward Manager and manages 22 Nurses and 18 healthcare assistants. He is very involved within the hospital and is one of the lead nurses for log roll training, meaning when a patient comes in with an injury he will roll them in a specific way to keep their spine in alignment.

He says the pay structures are really good and there are opportunities to work extra hours with added benefits. He explains, “There is always the potential to earn extra money at the hospital and they always use their own staff, rather than bringing in freelancers, which is beneficial for the patients.”

There is a strong social community at the hospital. One of the Ward Managers has set up a group for the Ward Managers in the hospital to meet up, socialise and share their experiences. As they all share the same issues, the group provides an opportunity discuss and work through them. He has a similar group with other staff members from his ward.

Explaining why people should relocate to Northampton and join the healthcare system there, Lorand says, “it’s a brilliant location to live and work, with great transport routes and airports nearby, and the seaside just two hours away. I would not want to move out of Northampton, I like the area and the people so much.”